Cable Beach sunset, Broome Cable Beach, Broome – Image courtesy of australiasnorthwest.com

Broome Honeymoon Guide

Broome offers newlyweds a wide variety of natural and fascinating heritage sights to satisfy romantic couples.

Choose your own slice of white sand on Cable Beach for a spot of sunbathing or relax beneath a parasol on this sun-kissed 22km-long beach lapped by the warm turquoise waters of the Indian Ocean.

Stroll to Gantheaume Point to see dinosaur footprints believed to be more than 135 million years old.

Swim in the clear waters of the Indian Ocean, chase a surf wave, hire a jet ski and then savour a fiery sunset from the soft sand or enjoy the quintessential Broome experience – a sunset camel ride.

Marvel at the ‘Staircase to the Moon’ – when for three days following the full moon from April to October, reflections of the moon stretch out across shiny mud flats creating the beautiful illusion of a long silver staircase.

Explore a restored wooden pearl lugger and listen to tales of ’saltwater cowboys’ at Pearl Luggers. Or tour the Willie Creek Pearl Farm to learn about pearl farming, to see an oyster being ‘seeded’ and to discover how to choose that special pearl. Catch a movie at Sun Pictures, built in 1916 and thought to be the world’s oldest open-air cinema.

Paddle a sea kayak around Turtle Bay to see unusual rock formations while watching out for sea turtles. Cruise the bay on an authentic 104-year-old wooden pearl lugger or hike the 5km Point to Port Walk – one of the best short coastal walks in Australia.

Along the way you’ll see some of the more remote bays and beaches along the Broome Peninsula, including Reddell Beach, a crescent of white sand dotted with red boulders and fringed by grass-covered sand dunes.


What to see and do in Broome

As the pearling capital of Australia and western gateway to the Kimberley wilderness, Broome offers a huge range of natural phenomena and a host of fascinating heritage sights to satisfy the most curious of visitors.

Sitting on the western edge of the massive Kimberley region, Broome is a unique destination that holds visitors captivated by it's fiery red-ochre cliffs, the stunning azure waters of the Indian Ocean and an endless expanse of white-sand beaches.

Broome's best beaches are all within a 10 minute drive from the town centre, including Cable Beach, Reddell Beach and Town Beach overlooking Roebuck Bay.

Major attractions in and around Broome, include…

Cable Beach – Image courtesy of Paul Michael Photography

Cable Beach

 

Choose your own slice of white-sand heaven for a spot of sunbathing or relax beneath a parasol on this sun-kissed 22km-long beach that shelves into the warm turquoise waters of the Indian Ocean.

At the southern end of the beach, walking trails lead through the red dunes of Minyirr Park – a spiritual place for the Yawuru people. At the northern end, past the rocks, clothing is optional and locals are often seen in 4WDs enjoying sunset drinks overlooking the Indian Ocean.

Swim in the clear waters, chase a surf wave, hire a jet ski then enjoy the quintessential Broome experience – a sunset camel ride along Cable Beach.

Historical note: Cable Beach takes its name from the undersea telegraph cable from Java that came ashore there in 1899. It was used for international communications until 1914. However, little evidence remains of it today, except for Broome Courthouse, which is the old Cable Station.

More about Cable Beach


Theropod track at Gantheaume Point – Image courtesy of Damian Kelly

Gantheaume Point & Dinosaur Prints

Go hunting for dinosaur footprints below the red pindan cliffs of Gantheaume Point.

Beautiful at any time, but especially at dawn or sunset when the cliffs turn scarlet and the Indian Ocean brilliant turquoise, this peaceful lookout overlooks dinosaur footprints.

Located at the southern end of Cable Beach, these 135-million-year-old dinosaur footprints are impossible to find except at very low tides. Also, check out for ospreys returning with fish to their nests on the lighthouse, nearby.


Reddell Beach, Broome – Image courtesy of www.exploroz.com

Reddell Beach

This Broome beach offers stunning sunsets, but without tourists, camels or 4WDs cramping your style. The beach is located along Kavite Rd between Gantheaume Point and the port.

The beach is a favourite dog-walking spot, but due to the strong currents it's strictly for experienced swimmers only.


Staircase to the Moon, Broome – Image courtesy of reflectionsbroome.com.au

Staircase to the Moon

Marvel at the aptly-named, Staircase to the Moon, when for two nights every lunar month between April and October, reflections of the full moon shimmer above the glistening, exposed mud flats of Town Beach, creating the optical illusion of a golden staircase leading to the moon.

A lively evening market with food stalls sets up at Town Beach to celebrate this natural phenomenon.

Note: The small headland at the end of Hamersley St offers a less-crowded and arguably better view.

Elsewhere, a similar phenomenon occurs across the Kimberley and Pilbara coasts – in fact, anywhere with east-facing mudflats.

Other good viewing spots are One Arm Point at Cape Leveque, Cooke Point in Port Hedland, Sunrise Beach at Onslow, Hearson Cove near Dampier and the lookout at Cossack. Most visitor centres publish the dates on their websites.


Bronze cast statue of a pregnant Indigenous female diver, Broome – Image courtesy of www.australiasnorthwest.com

Pearling Memorial Sculptures

Admire and ponder the 3m-tall bronze cast statue of a pregnant Indigenous female diver clutching a pearl that pays tribute to the role women played in the often-brutal pearling industry.

The front inscriptions reads 'And precious the tear as that rain from the sky / Which turns into pearls as it falls in the sea', – Thomas Moore.

The statue of an Indigenous woman coming out of the water with a pearl shell also seeks to acknowledge those who were exploited as divers along the coastline south of Broome during the 'blackbirding' phase.

'Blackbirding' was the forcible kidnapping of Aboriginal women to pearl luggers, where they dived for pearl shells in deep water, often without breathing apparatus. Unsurprisingly, many of the women drowned.

The Memorial to Women of Pearling is located on the foreshore overlooking Roebuck Bay.

Life-size bronze sculptures of a hard-hat diver and three Japanese divers also commemorate Broome's pearling past in the small park in the middle of Carnarvon St.

The three statues, in the heart of Chinatown, commemorate Mr. Tokuichi Kuribayashi, Mr Hiroshi Iwaki and Mr Keith Francis Dureau, who were pioneers in the cultured pearling industry in Broome.


Broome Museum

Discover the origins of Cable Beach and Chinatown through exhibits devoted to the area's pearling history and WWII bombing in this quirky museum, occupying the former Customs House.


Port Beach & Jetty

Don't miss this pleasant sandy beach with good fishing from the jetty. You might even see whales, turtles or dolphins.


Old Convent Heritage Centre

Admire an amazing archival collection of photographs spanning over 100 years of interaction between the Sisters of St John of God with the people of the Kimberley.

The collection is housed in the heritage-listed Old Convent built in 1926 by a Japanese shipwright.


Sun Pictures

Catch a movie under the stars at Sun Pictures, built in 1916 and thought to be the world’s oldest open-air cinema.

The history of the Sun building is the history of Broome itself. A short 15-minute history tour runs on request during the Dry Season.


Streeter's Jetty

Discover the original pearl luggers' jetty located at the entrance to Dampier Creek. The jetty dates from the 1880s and has been rebuilt several times.

The thin rickety wooden structure pokes out into mangroves above brilliant water or stinky mudflats depending on the tides. The Yawuru name Jin-gurramarnin indicates where fresh water (from Dampier Creek) enters the mangroves. The jetty is still a popular fishing spot for locals. Interpretive panels detail the history.


Roebuck Bay

Discover pods of snubfin dolphins, dugongs, rays and turtles on a half-day cruise around Roebuck Bay.

Or enjoy the vistas from Roebuck Bay Lookout. Located at the end of Dampier Tce, the lookout also features interpretative panels from the local Yawuru.


Flying boat wrecks in Roebuck Bay, Broome – Image courtesy of Leon Mead Photography
 (www.leonmeadphotography.com)

WWII Flying Boat Wrecks

Check out the wreckage of WWII aircraft that poke out of the mud in Roebuck Bay.

During low tide (less than 1.3m) it's possible to venture out across the mudflats from Town Beach to the wrecks of Catalina and Dornier flying boats.

The planes had been attempting to evacuate refugees from Java during WWII, when they were attacked by Japanese Zero warplanes on March 3, 1942. More than 60 people and 15 flying boats (mainly Dutch and British) were lost. Only six wrecks are visible, with the rest hidden by deep water.

Check with the visitor centre for tide times. It's best to start your walk about an hour before low tide and head southeast for 1.5km (about 30 minutes). Note: the mud is very sticky and can hide objects. Watch out for marine hazards including jellyfish.

If that seems too much of an effort – just take the hovercraft tour.


Red Headed Honeyeater, Broome – Image courtesy of Broome Bird Observatory

BirdLife Australia

Established in 1988 by the RAOU (Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union), BirdLife Australia (formerly, Broome Bird Observatory) (www.broomebirdobservatory.com), is a research and education facility, that works for the conservation of the migratory shorebirds which visit Roebuck Bay.

The tidal mudflats of Roebuck Bay are a vital staging post for thousands of migratory birds, coming from as far away as Siberia.

The observatory is located on the shores of Roebuck Bay, in a peaceful coastal setting 25km east of Broome. BirdLife Australia offers quiet walking trails, secluded bush campsites and a choice of low-key rooms.

There are a number of tours and courses available as well as volunteering opportunities. (Photo: Red Headed Honeyeater)


Malcolm Douglas Wilderness Park

Check out the crocs (don't miss the 3pm feeding), as well as kangaroos, cassowaries, emus, dingoes, jabirus and numerous other birds at this 30-hectare animal wildlife reserve located 16km northeast of Broome.


Bronze cast statue of a pregnant Indigenous female diver, Broome – Image courtesy of www.australiasnorthwest.com

Willie Creek Pearl Farm

Head out to Willie Creek Pearl Farm to learn more about cultured pearls and the pearl farming industry. The farm (www.williecreekpearls.com.au) occupies a stunning coastal location around 7.5km north of Broome.

There's a choice of several tours that give an unique insight into the process of modern cultured pearl farming, from shell to showroom, including a cruise along Willie Creek’s azure waters to view live oysters suspended in their natural environment amid native flora and fauna.

Don't be tempted to swim, as there are large salties (saltwater crocodiles) around.


James Price Point, Broome – Image courtesy of www.australiasnorthwest.com

James Price Point

Spend a pleasant afternoon out of town wandering beneath the amazing red pindan cliffs of the Dampier Peninsula at James Price Point.

The striking red pindan cliffs of Walmadan (named for a local warrior) are located in the middle of the Lurujarri Songline, around 35km from Cape Leveque Rd and 60km from Broome airport.

This is an important cultural site of the Goolarabooloo people.

Bush campsites (three-night maximum) sit on the bluff overlooking the cliffs and Indian Ocean.


Rowley Shoals Marine Park

Discover some of the best diving in Australia at Rowley Shoals Marine Park, which lie approximately 300km from Broome in the Indian Ocean, on the edge of Australia's continental shelf.

Protected by a marine park, there's more than 600 species of fish and 200-plus different varieties of coral. It's a good 12-hour cruise from land, and the shoals only see a small number of visitors each year. Several Broome operators offer multi-night cruises for experienced divers. The shoals also attract large numbers of migratory sea birds.


Purnululu National Park

The Kimberley

Broome is also the gateway to the Kimberley and Pilbara regions, home to Karijini National Park, Purnululu National Park, Bungle Bungle Ranges and Kunumurra.

Covering nearly 423,000 km2, the Kimberley region offers some of Western Australia’s most unique wilderness, as well as several coastal and outback towns that offer vastly diverse experiences.

Explore ancient gorges, swim in freshwater pools under plunging waterfalls and experience the quintessential Australian landscape of blue skies, red earth, gum trees, wallabies and crocodiles.

Follow ancient cave systems in Tunnel Creek National Park, walk through the spectacular Windjana Gorge, cruise the vast inland sea of Lake Argyle and discover the world’s second largest meteorite crater at Wolfe Creek Crater National Park.

More about The Kimberley


Fortescue Falls, Karijini National Park, WA

The Pilbara

Covering more than 500,000km2 (195,000mi2) – twice the size of the United Kingdom – the Pilbara region offers some of Western Australia’s most stunning natural landscapes, dating back more than four billion years.

This ancient region is home to the awe inspiring Karijini National Park, Millstream-Chichester National Park and Murujuga National Park. Here you can explore deep rocky canyons that lead to tranquil freshwater plunge pools filled from tumbling waterfalls and experience the quintessential Pilbara landscape of fierce blue skies, red earth, ancient gorges and dry scrub land.

The Burrup Peninsula is the perfect place to discover the unique art, history and culture of the Aboriginal people of the Pilbara. Explore some of the more than 700 historic Indigenous archaeological sites and one million rock engravings (petroglyphs), many dating back 40,000 years.

Offshore, unwind on a choice of dazzling white-sand beaches and swim in untouched coral gardens in the Dampier Archipelago and Mackerel Islands.

More about The Pilbara


Where to stay in Broome

Broome (and nearby Cable Beach) offer an excellent choice of accommodation options to suit most honeymoon budgets, including the following 4- and 5-star hotels…

Oaks BroomeOaks Broome
Location: 99 Robinson Street, Broome
Rating: 4.5-star
Ave nightly price: AUD161 per room
Description: Oaks Broome is set on the picturesque Roebuck Bay, surrounded by beautiful landscaped gardens and 2 outdoor swimming pools. Guests can enjoy 30 minutes of free internet access in the reception daily. On certain dates guests can enjoy the natural phenomenon of the Staircase to the Moon on Roebuck Bay. Each stylish, modern room opens onto a balcony overlooking the pools. The Oaks Broomes cafe, restaurant and bar also look over the pools, adding to the tropical feel. In-room broadband internet is available. Just a 10-minute drive away is Cable Beach - one of the most popular attractions in Broome. You can also use the property to explore the amazing, secluded landscape of Western Australia, as Broome is known as the southern gateway to the Kimberley region. Broome Turf Club is a 10-minute drive away.

Mercure BroomeMercure Broome
Location: Weld Street, Broome
Rating: 4-star
Ave nightly price: AUD101 per room
Description: Situated within close walking distance to the heart of Broome, this hotel offers quality accommodation with excellent leisure facilities, just a 10-minute drive from Cable Beach. Broome Historical Museum is a 7-minute walk away. Mercure Broome offers spacious accommodation, close to the sea. Guests can relax around the large outdoor swimming pool or have a game of tennis. They can also enjoy a cold beer or refreshing cocktail from one of the hotel’s 3 bars. The peaceful location of this hotel allows guests to fully relax whilst still being close to all of Broome’s attractions. The hotel can also arrange for guests to join in on one of the many local tours. Roebuck Bay is just a 10-minute walk away where on certain dates you can experience the Staircase to the Moon natural phenomenon. Broome Turf Club is a 10-minute drive.

Cable Beach Club Resort & SpaCable Beach Club Resort & Spa
Location: Cable Beach
Rating: 4.5-star
Ave nightly price: AUD249 per room
Description: The award-winning Cable Beach Club Resort & Spa overlooks the iconic Cable Beach, a 23 km stretch of white sand. The property features a poolside bar, 4 restaurants, a day spa and a mini golf course. Leisurely afternoons can be spent at the adults-only Ocean Pool or you can enjoy a treatment at the world-class Chahoya Spa by LÓccitane. Younger guests can visit the playground or the children's pool and waterpark. Boasting private verandas, the spacious air-conditioned rooms feature Asian or colonial-style décor, a flat-screen TV and an iPod docking station. All rooms offer a comfortable arm chair, an in-room safe and a minibar. All rooms include free parking. Club Restaurant offers a selection of fine wines, while Rambutan serves classic Malaysian cuisine and offers lovely views over the pool area. The resort's interior displays a collection of Australian art, including works of Sir Sidney Nolan. At the rear of the property you will find the Blue Body Buddha Sanctuary, an ornamental garden ideal for relaxation and meditation. A short 10-minute drive from Broome Airport, Cable Beach Club Resort boasts commanding views of the coastline.

The Pearle of Cable BeachThe Pearle of Cable Beach
Location: 14 Millington Road, Broome
Rating: 5-star
Ave nightly price: AUD135 per room
Description: Just a 10-minute walk from the white sands of Cable Beach, the Pearle of Cable Beach Resort offers free Wi-Fi throughout the property. The luxury rooms and villas are set amongst landscaped grounds. Inspired by the exotic pavilion homes of South-East Asia, The Pearle offers spacious rooms featuring its own private swimming pool and a designer kitchen. The Pearle Café overlooks the 25 metre heated/cooled infinity-edge swimming pool. Other facilities include an early/late check-out lounge, guest laundry, resort shop and day spa. The tour desk can assist with all your scooter, car hire and tour booking requirements. Wireless internet access is available. The Pearle of Cable Beach is a 10-minute drive from Broome Airport and Broome city centre. Gantheaume Point is a 10-minute drive away.

Kimberley Sands Resort and SpaKimberley Sands Resort and Spa
Location: Murray St, Broome
Rating: 5-star
Ave nightly price: AUD114 per room
Description: This 5-star resort offers a variety of day spa options, free onsite parking and spacious luxurious accommodation, just 500 metres from Cable Beach. Each room offers a private balcony and a pillow menu. The on-site day spa features individual treatment rooms, Li’Tya Day Spa Dreaming products, 1 Vichy shower treatment rooms, a juice bar, sauna and a hair salon. Kimberley Sands Resort's tour desk can arrange for customized tours upon request – from private viewings at the Paspaley Pearl's showroom to individual tours of Broome's beaches, galleries and Chinatown. Malcolm Douglas Crocodile Park is a 12-minute drive away. Kimberley Sands Resort is 5 km from Broome International Airport and 6 km from the heart of Chinatown.


Find the best deal, compare prices and read what other travellers have to say about these and more hotels in Broome at TripAdvisor.


Best time to visit Broome

The best time to visit Broome is in July and August during the winter dry season from May to November, when temperatures reach an average high of around 30ºC (86°F).

Broome experiences a tropical climate with two seasons: a dry season and a wet season. August to October is the driest time of the year.

For more climate info: Broome Weather Guide


How to get to Broome

Broome is located on the northern coast of the Kimberley region of Western Australia, around 2240km (1392 mi) north of Perth and 1871km (1162mi) southwest of Darwin.

The most convenient route to Broome is by air to Broome International Airport (BME) located less than 2km (1.2mi) west of Broome city centre.

From most international destinations this may require first flying into Perth Airport (PER), followed by a connecting flight to Broome International Airport (BME).

Qantas has direct flights to Broome from Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne and Perth; Virgin Australia Airlines offers direct flights to Broome from Perth.

For more information on how to get to Broome


Getting around Broome

The best way to get around Broome is on foot or bicycle. Hire cars and scooters are also available. Most hostels will rent out bicycles and scooters.

Numerous cycle paths and off-road tracks in and around Broome make hiring a bike the perfect way to getting around.

Broome Cycles (www.broomecycles.com.au) hire out mountain bikes by the day (AU$30) or week (AU$100) from their outlet in Chinatown, and from a trailer at Cable Beach Road & Sanctuary Drive during the dry season.

Broome Cycles also hire tandem bicycles for a bit of fun and road bikes for the keen road rider. Fat bikes are perfect for cruising soft sand – the tyre width makes beach riding easy.

Hire cars are available to reach those attractions that are further afield and cars are easily available from several international companies, including Hertz, Europcar and Budget.

Local operator Broome Broome (www.broomebroome.com.au) offers unlimited kilometres and alternative insurance conditions to those of the nationwide companies.

The Town Bus Service (www.bebus.com.au) provides a loop of all the major attractions, including Chinatown and Cable Beach, every 30 minutes during the Dry and every hour during the Wet. Under 16s ride free with an adult or pay AU$2 without.

Reliable taxi services in town include Broome Taxis, Chinatown Taxis or Pearl Town Taxis.


More about Broome…


Latest update: Broome: 16 September, 2020


SAVE $$$ on honeymoon travel deals

Search, compare and book the lowest possible prices on discounted airfares and hotels from our online travel partners.



Advertising